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Please don't buy Boehner's book. This whole Republican thing of actively assisting in burning down our democracy and then publishing a book to explain how it was somebody else's fault after-the-fact is not a behavior worth rewarding.

youtube.com/watch?v=2XTtZZqhs9

"Let's start with the most surreal case of situational ethics."

I need to remember that phrase... "situational ethics."

youtube.com/watch?v=-J5XDbnW5d

The same assholes who transformed a hunting club into the primary lobbying arm in support of armed mass murder turn out to be generally corrupt across the board. How unexpected.

I'm sort of against vaccine passports too, but after watching some Fox News coverage I'm starting to wonder if my stance is the wacko one.

ajc.com/politics/politics-blog

This seems a lot like persecuting Delta and Coke for their political beliefs. I could have sworn that Republicans claimed that this was a bad thing?

Just a bit of a reminder that the only consistent parts of the Republican platform are selfishness and cruelty.

'National Temper Tantrum': Hayes On GOP Bid To Cancel Critics Of Voter Suppression | All In | MSNBC

youtube.com/watch?v=piU78UaJ61

John Oliver's take on the National Debt. I'm hoping for a Kai Ryssdal response on Marketplace.

youtube.com/watch?v=yq_E3HquRJ

youtube.com/watch?v=URcUvFIUIh

This video claims that this is a "historical usage" that was deprecated in 1917. As a matter of historical fact I have no clue if this is true. I wasn't alive in 1917 though so I suspect this notation was alive and well up until at least 2001.

The example they give is pretty good and exactly explains how I think about it.

6 \div 2(1 + 2) \\
x \div y(j + k) \\
\frac{x}{y(j + k)} \Leftrightarrow x/(y(j+k))
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x = 6 \div 2(1 + 2) \\
x = 6 \div 2 \cdot (1 + 2) \\
x = \frac{6}{2} \cdot (1 + 2) \\
x = 3 \cdot (1 + 2) \\
x = 3 \cdot 3 \\
x = 9
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The internet claims that the correct answer is actually 9. In this situation it's one of the reasons I hate the "division" operator when writing things out mathematically. Algebra uses the fractional notation for a reason: It's unambiguous.

Interestingly the form it was presented in best translates to way a line in a program might write it. It's a bit funny to me that I see the algebraic translation first before I see the pure programmatical version.

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Added what appear to be the original form of the problem.

x = 6 \div 2(1 + 2) \\
x = \frac{6}{2(1 + 2)} \\
x = \frac{6}{2 + 4} \\
x = \frac{6}{6} \\
x = 1 \\
y = 6 \div 2(1 + 2) \\
y = \frac{6}{2(1 + 2)} \\
y = \frac{2 \cdot 3}{2(1 + 2)} \\
y = \frac{2 (1 + 2)}{2(1 + 2)} \\
y = 1 \\
z = 6/2 \space \space (1 + 2) \\
z = \frac{6}{2}(1 + 2) \\
z = \frac{\tfrac{6}{2}}{\tfrac{12}{4}} \\
z = \frac{3}{3} \\
z = 1
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I'm a sucker for those math problems that go around Facebook.

x = 6 \div 2(1 + 2) \\ 
x = \frac{6}{2(1 + 2)} \\
x = \frac{6}{2 + 4} \\
x = \frac{6}{6} \\
x = 1 \\
y = 6 \div 2(1 + 2) \\
y = \frac{6}{2(1 + 2)} \\
y = \frac{2 \cdot 3}{2(1 + 2)} \\
y = \frac{2 (1 + 2)}{2(1 + 2)} \\
y = 1

I hooked it up directly to my computer with an aux cable. This apparently means the mic won't work.

I've had trouble with the connections but the advertised features around active noise cancelling are actually pretty good. It nearly completely blocks out the sound I wanted it to. It also has a transparency mode which actually amplifies the sounds of the outside world so I can hear people talking to me better.

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Trying out some noise cancelling headphones. They're amazing when they're working. Unfortunately my luck with bluetooth devices has been pretty spotty and these are no exception.

This came up again because of a comment on another ongoing drama in development land. There's a developer on the outs for making pretty shitty code. The article covering it pointed out he'd been convicted of crimes related to being a shitty landlord.

Somebody in the comments claimed that behavior outside of their direct development work shouldn't have any bearing on what goes on with the development work. I made a simple reply reminding him of the Hans Reiser saga.

lwn.net/Articles/851072/

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After getting to Georgia Tech I restarted my adventures in source-based GNU/Linux distributions with Gentoo. I found myself very interested in what was going on with desktop responsiveness. I didn't have a great computer so the fact that Gentoo had special builds dedicated to desktop responsiveness appealed to me.

One of the suggestions in that category was a filesystem known as ReiserFS 3. I tried it out and it worked great on my computer. Over time I switched everything except my boot drives over to ReiserFS 3. The boot drive stayed on ext2.

This was around the same time I first started reading LWN and found out both that a ReiserFS 4 was in development, that this filesystem was named after its creator, and that the process was very contentious. There was strong push-back against Hans Reiser and Namesys from the Linux kernel community because the filesystem code wasn't really written in the normal kernel style. It had its own custom implementation of data structures and other sorts of things that make it hard for regular kernel maintainers to update it. Namesys and Hans Reiser assured the kernel devs this wouldn't be a problem because they intended to be around supporting ReiserFS 4 themselves.

In 2006 Hans Reiser murdered his estranged wife. He drained money out of Namesys to pay for his legal defense. In 2008 Hans Reiser was convicted for the murder.

Long before he was actually convicted I believed he'd done this because his story was essentially unbelievable. They found some of her blood in her car and he decided to remove the entire passenger seat from his vehicle the same day she went missing.

There's no doubt now though because he led the police to her body for a reduced sentence.

Somewhere in there I moved to xfs for my data drives and to ext3 for boot.

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Sometimes you go down a rabbit-hole and remember that you switched your preferred file system because its author murdered his ex-wife.

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